A noon conference for pediatrics residents with Chronicling Childhood Cancer authors

Perhaps it was the ambience of a brightly lit conference room overlooking downtown Ann Arbor. Maybe it was the audience of pediatrics residents at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, doctors devoting their lives to caring for children. Or it may have been this event’s focus on teens sharing their own advice for doctors based on their personal experiences. Whatever it was, something was very different about the Pediatrics Noon Conference that I led about the Chronicling Childhood Cancer book project from last year’s Literati book reading/signing event.

A couple months ago, I learned that residents hardly have an opportunity to interact with pediatric patients and their families outside of clinic visits. I was surprised–while medical school is peppered with patient presentations and opportunities to learn more from patients about their experiences, it seems as though these opportunities drop off in residency since residents have patients of their own.

That was unsettling to me, though. Especially with pediatric patients, I think that giving teens and young adults the chance to share their own experiences and perspectives can be invaluable, both for these youth as well as for people who are devoting their lives to caring for these individuals. It’s also a reminder of what it means to embrace PFCC, or patient- and family-centered care: the recognition that we as clinicians must view our patients as partners in their healthcare, and in doing so, acknowledge how much we can learn from our patients. Events such as these demonstrate that there are an infinite number of ways that we can improve and better care for our patients by hearing what they have to say.

At this event, I gave a brief overview of the research project before turning it over to three of the young authors themselves. Each individual shared some of their personal experiences and advice for doctors about just how much of an impact their interactions can have on patients. While the discussion was centered largely on the teens, their parents also contributed some insight. Overall, this was a change from the typical noon conference lecture, and it sounds like many appreciated what this unique noon conference had to offer.

I was more anxious preparing for this event than I have been in a while, and I think it’s because I’m more aware of how precious time in medical education can be. I know how much people fight over this time to make an impression on doctors in the making. It truly is incredible to me that I have had this opportunity; it’s crazy to think that I have been a part of their education, that I may have been able to influence the kind of physician that some of these residents may be with their patients.

One of the highlights for me was the very end. A number of people had to leave immediately since the event concluded right at 1pm, but I was amazed by how many people still chose to stick around and speak at length with each of these patients and their families. That meant so much to me, and I know that it meant a lot to the young authors. Instead of just getting their books signed and leaving, these residents took the time to connect with the teens and their parents. In the end, I know that this was the point of it all: to give residents a chance to get to know and learn from teens with cancer in a different way, and to make space for teens to share their personal experiences.

Pediatric Noon Conference- Outline

Pediatrics Noon Conference- Slides

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Filed under Chronicling Childhood Cancer: Illuminating the Illness Experience through Narrative

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